Writer Wednesday: A Winner and A Book Cover Reveal!

*Taps microphone* *clears throat*

I’d like to announce that Awesome Author Sarah Fine is the winner of The Emotion Thesaurus!

Congrats, Sarah! Email me your addy and I’ll send it in the mail. 😉

  Now, on to the cover reveal. I’ve been following Heather McCorkle on Twitter, Facebook, and her blog for many months now and I’m SO excited to be a part of this! I LOVE her cover art and this one doesn’t disappoint! WOOT!

 

It’s finally here, the cover reveal for Heather McCorkle’s Rise of a Rector, the final novel in her channeler series (due out this October). To celebrate Heather is giving away two copies of her historical fantasy novel, To Ride A Puca. Before we get to that though, here is the cover:

To add it to your Goodreads lists click here. If you’d like to check out the rest of the channeler series (her novella Born of Fire is now FREE on Amazon & B&N!) you can do so on Amazon and Barnes and Noble. To win an eBook of To Ride A Puca, all you have to do is help Heather spread the word. There will be two winners! To enter fill out the form below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

 

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Mental Health Monday–Of Alters and Core Personalities

Lydia Kang CC’ed me on an email from a writer who is devloping a character with Dissociative Identity Disorder. Super cool! As a result, I’ve decided to repost an oldie, but goodie post on Dissociative Disorders (in green). I have further comments below, specific to HOW TO WRITE A CHARACTER WITH DISSOCIATIVE SYMPTOMS.

The DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV) categories various forms of dissociation (a disruption in memory, awareness, identity, and/or perception).

  • Depersonalization disorder: period of feeling detached from one’s self; this is often seen in anxiety disorders such as panic disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder…or if you stare at yourself in the mirror for too long. Go ahead, try it. Go on.
  • Dissociative Amnesia: a person experiences significant impairment in recall of personal information, often resulting from a serious trauma; duration varies; often spontaneously remits
  • Dissociative fugue: a person “forgets” who they are and may travel to a different city & pick up an entirely different life; this may last hours to days or longer, depending on how severe. It can spontaneously remit and is usually the result of a significant traumatic event.
  • Dissociative Identity Disorder (previously known as Multiple Personality Disorder): a very rare disorder where a person’s psyche is fractured into several (2-100) different personalities. These personalities are known as “alters,” and each has his or her own way of behaving. Depending on the severity of the situation, the person may or may not be aware of their alters. If the individual is not aware, the times when alters “take over” are experienced as black outs or “lost time.”

It is purported that DID develops as a means of self-protection. Often, those with DID have experienced significant abuse as a child and the personality fragments into several different “people.” This allows the “main personality” to compartmentalize trauma and function in the face of it.

People with dissociative disorders do not choose to become another personality. The idea is that it is out of their control. With therapy, a person becomes more aware of their alters and learns to communicate with them until they are reintegrated.

Dissociative disorders are challenging to treat because people are often reluctant to come into treatment and co-morbid conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, and substance use disorders can occur.

That’s all well and good, but how does one go about WRITING a character with DID???

The key to distinguishing each alter personality is to make sure each alter HAS THEIR OWN VOICE. It’s imperative that there’s some clue binding each alter together, especially with the core (the personality seen most) personality. For example, alters are generally aware of the core and can comment about them while they are being dominant. Furthermore, an alter may try to hurt the core (via cutting, burning) or may engage in activities the core wouldn’t ordinarily do, like going to a club, bar, having a one night stand, etc. Whoever the core encounters would be surprised by their “odd” behavior. It would be excellent fodder for a tension-filled dialogue and scene.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this post is for WRITING PURPOSES ONLY and is NOT to be construed as medical advice or treatment.

Check out Lydia’s post on Medical Mondays and Sarah Fine’s blog, The Strangest Situation.

Mental Health Monday–Telepsychiatry

You’ve perhaps heard of surgeons using robotics to perform surgery on someone in another city, state, or even country?

Well, psychiatrists can also evaluate and treat patients remotely. Called telepsychiatry, it’s a relatively new method of connecting providers with clients when distance is a limiting factor.

I’ve never done telepsychiatry, but know colleagues who have. I’d imagine it could be challenging, considering we use all our senses (including smell) to evaluate clients. On the other hand, a client usually has a therpist or case worker present with them, while the psychiatrist communicates via camera/TV.

So, writers, if you have a character in an isolated location and they need a therapist/psychiatrist, make sure they have access to the interwebz and maybe even Skype. 😉

Let me know if you have any writerly mental health questions, and I’d be happy to answer them here on Mental Health Monday. Check out Lydia’s Medical Mondays as well and Sarah Fine’s blog, The Strangest Situation for more psych related topics.

Remember, these posts are for WRITING PURPOSES ONLY and are NOT to be construed as medical advice or treatment.

Sisterhood of the Traveling Blog–Who Else Is Watching You?

This month, Lydia asks:

Outside of your writing friends, do other people (work, family, friends) know you blog? What do they think of it? Have you ever been hit with a, “Hey! I read your blog today!” from someone you never expected to read it?

FANTASTIC question, Lydia!

When I first started writing (over 3 1/2 years ago now!), I didn’t tell anybody. Back then, I wasn’t sure where my writing was going. I had dreams, of course, but really it was a way to destress, do something creative, and it was FUN!!!!

Then I joined QueryTracker’s forum and met a bunch of fantastic people! With time, I became comfortable enough to start this blog. It was slow going at first, but as the months passed it developed into what you see today.

My blog posts are connected to Twitter and Facebook and since I’ve friended some co-workers, friends, and family there, they’ve seen the links. Much to my surprise and delight, my blog has spread from writer friends to people in my “real life” circle.

It’s been nice to see them “like” a post and even comment on them!

What’s more, they whole-heartedly support my endeavors. They send “*hugs* and chocolate” when I get a rejection and they send “CONGRATULATIONS! and SQUEEEs!!!” when I announce accomplishments.

Even better, it’s hard for me to go a day to two without someone asking me about my book and my short story!

SO. COOL!

How about you? Any non-writerly peeps find your blog?

Mental Health Monday–Zombies ARE Real

Photo Credit

All the buzz about Zombies has me freaked out. Like for real. I can handle vamps, werewolves, even ghosts. But zombies? No. Way.

And here’s why!

Zombies. Are. Real.

Named after Jules Cotard (a French neurologist who first described the condition in 1880), Cotard Syndrome is a delusion where the sufferer believes they are dead, or are putrefying, or have lost their blood or internal organs. Sometimes (rarely), it includes delusions of immortality (so in that regard, vampires are real too!)

Related to Capgras Syndrome, Cotard Syndrome can occur in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder. It can also be a (rare) side effect of Acyclovir (an anti-viral medication).

Treatment includes pharmacotherapy (medication) with anti-psychotics and mood stabilizers. ECT (Electroconvulsive Therapy) has also been used.

Has anybody encountered any literature including a character who believed they were dead, decaying, or that their organs were gone?

Be sure to check out Lydia’s Medical Monday and Sarah’s The Strangest Situation.

Remember, these posts are for writing purposts ONLY and are NOT to be construed as medical advice or treamtent.

Let me know if you have a writerly mental health question and I can address it here on Mental Health Monday! 😉

 

Mental Health Monday–Capgras Syndrome

Capgras Syndrome is a delusional disorder whereby the sufferer believes that a friend, family member, spouse, or someone else they know has been replaced by an identical-looking imposter. Most commonly associated with Schizophrenia, the disorder has also been seen in brain injury and dementia. 

It was first labeled in 1923 by French psychiatrist Dr. Joseph Capgras, whose patient believed “doubles” had replaced her husband and others she knew. (Thank you, Wikipedia, for that bit of information.) 🙂

Treatment includes medications such as anti-psychotics (Haldol, Zyprexa, etc).

What books or movies have you seen where a character believes others have been replaced by imposters?

Check out Lydia’s Medical Monday and Sarah’s The Strangest Situation.

Remember, these posts are for writing purposes ONLY and are NOT to be construed as medical advice or treatment.

Photo Credit

Mental Health Monday–Imaginary Friends…Normal Or Not???

I often hear writers liken their characters to imaginary friends. Heck I do it too.

What’s interesting to me is that imaginary friends during childhood are quite normal. It’s a phase of development where the child is learning creativity and how to integrate their personality.

But what about imaginary friends in adults?

I’m not talking about our characters. I’m talking about adults who actually have imaginary friends. There’s not a lot of research on this (can you imagine getting a sample of people who’d be willing to share such information?), but the studies that are out there seem to link imaginary friends with dissociative identity disorder (aka multiple personality disorder). This disorder occurs when a child faces severe neglect and abuse (sexual or physical) and the only defense they have is to “fragment” their personality. Doing this compartmentalizes the trauma away as a means to protect the self.

As adults, people with DID note missing periods of time, the feeling that other people are inside them and these other people can take control, and they can hear voices (generally inside their head).

Another theory of imaginary friends in adults comes from attachment theory. Some kids (maybe single children or neglected children, for example) don’t get enough emotional nourishment and develop imaginary friends as a support system.

Interesting, huh?

Don’t forget to check out Lydia’s Medical Monday and Sarah Fine’s The Strangest Situation.

These posts are for writing purposes ONLY and are NOT to be construed as medical advice or treatment.